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THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SCHOOL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS, STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT, AND JOB SATISFACTION LEVELS AMONG TEACHERS
by
ROY FRANKLIN MORRIS JR.
(Under Direction the of C. KENNETH TANNER)
ABSTRACT
This study examined the relationships between the physical characteristics of the school, student achievement and behavior, and job satisfaction levels among teachers. The purpose of the study was to determine if correlations existed between schools with certain physical characteristics and high levels of student achievement, good behavior, or teacher satisfaction. Specifically, 13 measures of the school facility such as the presence of natural light, carpet, acoustic tile, ventilation, noise, mold, consistent temperature control, and general maintenance were compared to 10 measures of student behavior and four measures of teacher satisfaction. Controlling for socio-economic status, teacher experience levels, and teacher education levels, these measures were compared to levels of student achievement on the Georgia High School Graduation Test, the SAT, and ACT. The population of the study was 164 teachers from 28 high schools in Central and North Georgia. Each teacher provided a rating on a scale of 1 to 10 for each of the 27 measures. The data were correlated utilizing a series of Pearson product moment coefficients as an indication of the level of statistical relationship between measures. At least three responses were obtained from each of the 28 schools.
The results of these analyses indicated that among the schools participating in this study, no significant correlations existed between the physical characteristics of the school and student achievement. Moderate correlations existed between the quality of the physical environment, teacher satisfaction, and student behavior. The most significant correlation was revealed between teacher satisfaction and student behavior with 18% of the variance in teacher satisfaction ratings attributable to student behavior. A variety of characteristics revealed significant correlations to health measures for both students and teachers. In general, teachers who worked in cleaner schools with better ventilation reported using fewer sick days and rated students higher for motivation; they reported less student lethargy and absenteeism as well.
From these findings it may be concluded that relationships do exist between the physical characteristics of the school, the level of teacher satisfaction, student behavior, and the health of teachers and students.

Posted: July 2003 by Ken Tanner


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