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This set of educational specifications was donated by Dr. Nelyne Allan, Retired art teacher. Dr. Allan was Art Consultant for Bay County Schools when these specifications were developed. They are exhibited here as a model for school planning and design.


Educational Specifications

Secondary Schools*

Bay County School Board

Bay County Florida

June, 1969

*Compiled by Liyan Song

Coordinated by Ken Tanner

October 1999


TABLE OF CONTENTS

FORWORD

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INTRODUCTION

GLOSSARY

PHILOSOPHY

OBJECTIVES

EDUCATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

Administration
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Art
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Business Education
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Co-operative Education
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Driver Education
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Food Service
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Guidance
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Home Economics
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Industrial Arts
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Language Arts
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Large Area
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Maintenance and Operation

Mathematics
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Media Center
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Music
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Physical Education
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ROTC
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Science
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Site
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Social Studies
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Special Education
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OVERALL CONSIDERATIONS

 

FOREWORD

 

In a rapidly changing technological world, educational needs are becoming more critical and complex. Everyone ­ parents, educators, business leaders, and public officials ­ is interested in and sensitive to, in varying degrees, the needs of a good educational program. Well-planned facilities are necessary to accomplish a quality program of education.

School enrollment in Bay County has exceeded adequate facilities for a sound educational program. Careful planning is necessary and must be a continuing process if adequate environment is provided to meet the county's educational needs.

Changing methods of instruction, new curricula and new teaching aids are making for a more sophisticated educational process. These changes deem it no longer advisable to trust the complicated educational planning to informal discussions between architects and educators. In the past, architects have been asked to plan facilities into which the instructional program was later professional decisions. These decisions must be the result of many people, lay and professional, and be organized into written specifications as a means of communicating them to the architect.

The committees and staff who have compiled these materials sincerely hope they prove as valuable reference. They believe sound planning results in good school plants, which in turn will house the most effective instructional programs and provide the best possible education for the students of Bay County.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

 

Guidelines for encompassing educational needs of the multifaceted youth of today and tomorrow cannot be adequately identified by one person, discipline, or area of a large curriculum. Yet contribution of plans resulting from knowledge and experience in specific areas is vital to a comprehensive statement of an educational program.

The Florida State Department of Education is to be commended for the services made available for preparation of education specifications under the leadership of Harry L. Pelley, Director of Educational Facilities Planning Division. Consultation was provided from this department in the person of Robert J. Wehking. Without this assistance Bay County have been unable to develop educational specifications at this time. Mr. Wehking initially oriented key administrative personnel with a visual presentation of basic considerations.

Realizing the need for new secondary facilities, Thomas C. Todd, Superintendent appointed a Steering Committee composed of seven members. The Steering Committee selected Area Committees from all secondary personnel, grades nine through twelve, including special education and vocational education. Through the capable and dynamic leadership of Mr. Wehking the committees were able to function rapidly and effectively through setting up workable methods and procedures. Progress points were perted in order to meet our goals on schedule.

When selecting those persons who would share time, knowledge, and experiences to recommend a quality secondary program, the Steering Committee consulted County specialists in individual areas.

Selection of participants was made upon consideration of academic excellence, proven leadership, and the vision to project future needs of secondary students. The cooperation and speed with which the committee operated is highly commendable. The county is indebted to the following persons for this document:

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Harry L. Pelley, Director, Educational Facilities Planning
Robert J. Wehking, Consultant, Educational Facilities Planning

GENERAL CHAIRMAN
Lucille Moore, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction

EDITORIAL CHAIRMAN
Nelyne Allan, Art Consultant

STEERING COMMITTEE
G. L. Kelly, Administrative Assistant
Merritt Brown, Consultant, Planning and Assessment
John Taylor, General Secondary Consultant
Joe Ovca, Secondary Principal
Luther McDonald, Secondary Principal
Sara Bone, Secondary Resource
Nancy Rigell, Secondary Resource

AREA COMMITTEES

ADMINISTRATION AND GUIDANCE
G. L. Kelly, Administrative Assistant, Chairman
Joe Ovca, Secondary Principal
Luther McDonald, Secondary Principal
Sara Bone, Guidance Counselor

ART
Rudolph Peuhs, Art Instructor, Chairman
Marguerite Shumaker, Art Instructor
Eleanor Taylor, Art Instructor
Nelyne Allan, Art Consultant

BUSINESS EDUCATION and CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION
Eleanor Terry, Business Education instructor, Chairman
John Williams, COP and Typing Instructor
Francis Hall, Business Education Instructor
George Kimmel, Assistant Principal

DRIVER EDUCATION
Ben Stevens, Driver Education Instructor)
Charles Seal, Driver Education Instructor) Co-chairmen
Don Dillard, Driver Education Instructor
Tony Lunceford, Driver Education Instructor

FOOD SERVICE
Elizabeth Nixon, Director School Food Service, Chairman
Myrtle Campbell, Lunchroom Manager
Irma McQuagge, Assistant Lunchroom Manager
Edna Mashburn, Lunchroom Manager

HOME ECONOMICS
Janice Hill, home Economics Insructor, Chairman
Anita Segler, Home Economics Instructor
Ann logue, Home Economics Instructor

INDUSTRIAL ARTS
Hosea Battles, Industrial Arts Instructor, Chairman
Woodrow Cheek, Drafting Instructor
Claude Weaver, Shop Instructor
Mike Zekas, Director Vocational School

LANGUAGE ARTS and SPECIAL READING
Marjorie Fay, English Instructor, Chairman
Marjorie Edenfield, English Instructor
Ann kirkland, Curriculum Co-ordinator
Janice Slaughter, English Instructor
Sue Moore, Reading Consultant

LARGE AREA
Luther McDonald, Secondary Principal, Chairman
Joe Ovca, Secondary Principal
Myrtle Campbell, Lunchroom Manager
Sandra Lunceford, English Instructor
Rodney Neudecker, Glee Club Director
Arabelle Grant, Processing Librarian

MAINTENANCE and OPERATION
Marvin McCain, Assistant Superintendent for Finance, Chairman
C. H. Redmon, Maintenance Foreman
Jack Gilbert, Assistant Maintenance Forman
Dallas Smith, maintenance Assistant

MATHEMATICS
Kenneth Day, Trigonometry and Algebra Instructor, Chairman
Mildred Dickinson, Mathematics Instructor
Dauhrice Gibson, mathematics Instructor
John Taylor, Mathematics Consultant

MEDIA CENTER
Iris Owens, Director Educational Media, Chairman
Rebecca Croley, Librarian
Margaret Allan, Librarian
Thera Davenport, Librarian

MUSIC
Rodney Neudecker, Glee Club Director, Chairman
Ronald Hardy, Band Director
Stephen Terry, Band Director
Robert Cain, Music Consultant

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Willie Carter, Physical Education Consultant, Chairman
Sarah Moose, Physical Education Instructor
Sue Sharpe, Physical Education Instructor
Carolyn Blakney, Physical Education Instructor

ROTC
Joseph Riley, ROTC Instructor, Chairman
Richard Atchison, ROTC INSTRUCTOR

SCIENCE
Grafton Sharp, Biology Instructor, Chairman
James Boutwell, Science Instructor
Patricia Farriss, Biology and General Science Instructor
Harvey Casey, Science Co-ordinator

SPECIAL EDUCATION
Nelle Messer, Special Education Director, Chairman
Maedell Stock, Consultant, Elementary Educable Mentally Retarded
Marqaret Lewic, Consultant, Trainable Mentally Retarded
Gordon Jackson, Consultant, Secondary Educable Mentally Retarded

SITE
Joe Hull, Physical Education Instructor, Chairman
Thomas C. Todd, Superintendent of Schools
Joe Ovca, Secondary Principal
Willie Carter, Physical Education Consultant
Rhett Young, Supervisor of Transportation

SOCIAL STUDIES
DeJack William, history Instructor, Chairman
Betty Sue Evans, History Instructor
Bob hall, history Instructor
Clarenc3 Pilcher, Social Studies Consultant

PROFESSIONAL ADVISORS

CLASSROOM TEACHERS ASSOCIATION
Kenneth Day, President

ADULT VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Mike Zekas, Director

ARCHITECTS
J. Edwin Chancey
James G. Chapman
Thomas h. Daniels
Charles A. Gaskin
Chester A. Parker
Mandeville Smith

LAY ADVISORS
BAY COUNTY COUNCIL OF PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATIONS
Arlene M. Devereaux. President
BAY COOUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Gerry Clemmons, Chairman Education Committee

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The basic concept underlying educational specifications is: the statement of the instructional program has priority with facilities planning being concomitant. Particularly important is stating these instructional needs so flexibility and change inherent in democratic schools will be accommodated. The awareness of what constitutes and effective educational program is within itself a worthy outcome of the exhaustive study necessary to adequately state specifications. The task of the architect becomes one of fitting these program specifications into facilities utilizing space and community resources.

Conceiving quality educational specifications for secondary schools in any part of a democratic society must be a continually changing, evolving process. Therefore, perceptions from the conservative and innovative elements of Bay County have been combined for a tempered, in-life criteria for these specifications.

Structuring guidelines to modify behavior of students has far-reaching responsibilities. The County felt the combined efforts of administrators, master teachers, teachers, non-instructional personnel and lay citizens were necessary to provide a broad background of academic preparation and experience. The preparation of this document has enabled a joint contribution of their talents toward the development of realistic secondary specifications to more adequately meet the needs of the students. Assuming the instructor has knowledge and experience beyond that of the student, these guidelines give opportunity for flexible, yet strong, curriculum and positive behavioral modification of the learner. Assuming the student can partially identify has needs at the secondary level, opportunities are provided for him to exercise choices and values.

Recommendations contained in this document are not policies adopted by the Bay County School Board, nor is the architect to treat them as such. It is anticipated the instructional content and methods will continually be updated to keep pace with positive changed in education. This document contains efforts to communicate to the archit4ect, school personnel, and lay citizens the aims and objectives in each area of instruction and their supportive components Detailed lists of small equipment and instructional materials are available in appendices at the office of the Bay County School Superintendent

 

Each area has followed the format below as closely as practicable.

I. PHILOSOPHY
  A. Individual Program
  B. Course Purposes and Objectives
  C. Course Content
II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS
  A Course Title and/or Room Use
  B Activities
    1. Teacher
    2. Students
  C. Grouping
    1. Size of Class
    2. Arrangement or Grouping of Students

III. SPACE NEEDS
  A. Estimate of Space Needs
    1. Projected Enrollment of Subjects
    2. Policy of Group Sizes
    3. Number of Sections of Each Size Group
    4. Number of Periods in Schedule
    5. Number of teacher Stations Required
    6. Estimated Amount of Square Footage Needed as a "guide Only"
  B. Furniture and Equipment

IV. STORAGE
  A. Number, Types, and Sizes of Items to be Stored
  B. Size of Cabinets or Shelving
  C. Size of Storage Area

V. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  A. Environmental
    1. Visual
    2. Hearing
    3.Climate Control ­ Heating, Ventilating, Temperature
  B. Utilities
  C. Service ­ School and Community
    1.. Access Drives
    2. Parking
    3. Doorways for Delivery, Access
  D. Storage
  E. Floor Materials, Room Finishes (Performance Qualities)

VI. RELATIONSHIPS (BUBBLE DIAGRAM)
  A,  Within the Program
  B.  To Closely Related Programs
  C.  To Entire Campus

VII. BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Accreditation" reference throughout this document is to: 1968-69 Proposed Accreditation Standards for Florida Schools published October, 1968, State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida.

 

GLOSSARY

 

Acoustical material: Material used to absorb or reflect sound

Acoustically treated: Finished with materials of desirable acoustical qualities

Batt insulation: An insulating material composed of fiberglass adhered to a paper, the back of which is coated with aluminum foil

Beam: A horizontal structural member

Bubble Diagram: A diagrammatic relationship of physical facilities

Classroom: An instructional area of specified size and usage

Closed Circuit Television: A television system which limits distribution of an image to those receivers which are directly connected to the program initiation point by coaxial cable or microwave link


Colorado (Driver Education): machine for testing sight

Computer Assisted Instruction; A system whereby a student communicates with a stored program by typing input at a student station and receiving feedback information from the computer. Visual facilities may be attached

Conference Desk with Overhang: A desk with sufficient extension to the side of teacher for student to be seated and work comfortably

110V Convenience Outlet: Duplex electrical outlet for 110-volt usage

208V or 220V Convenience Outlet: An electrical outlet for 208 volt or 220-volt usage

Decibel: A unit of measurement for sound

Depth Perception (Driver Education): machine for testing sight

Egress: Exit

Electrical Book Charger: An electric machine for automatically stamping a borrower's number and date on a card used for circulation of books or other media

Field of Vision (Driver Education): Machine for testing sight

Foot-Candle: A unit of measurement of light

Forum Discussion Formation: Arrangement allowing discussion-involving audience

Institutional Size (Food Service): No. 10 size cans or larger of foodstuffs, usually packed six to case
Intercommunication System: A comprehensive system of intercommunication between all departments, teaching stations, and related facilities

Large Conference Room: An area of assembly for 12-20 people

Large Group Instruction: Grouping of learners into numbers of 150 or more enabling mass exposure to visual and/or verbal observation

Lowrater: Self-leveling dispenser

Micro-projector: An instrument for projecting microscopic slides

Modular Scheduling: Flexible scheduling which provides for blocks of times, variable in length and spacing

Movable Space Dividers: Storage cabinets, chalkboards, etc. used as sight barriers

Multi-purpose Conference Room: An area containing flexible facilities to accommodate a wide scope of uses

Panic Hardware: Electrical switches allowing for fast control of electrical systems

Positive Ventilation: Input of air is greater than outtake

Proofing Cabinet: Cabinet providing controlled heat for developing yeast in bread products

Realia: Tangible or visible things that serve the purpose of teaching, such as objects, relics, specimens, replicas, and exhibits

Referral Services (guidance): Services outside the school to which students are directed for help, such as Health Department, Guidance Clinic, welfare Department, Employment service, etc.

Rigid Insulation: An insulation of fiber glass, pressed wood fibers, etc., with an inherent rigid composition

Simulator (Driver Education): Trailer equipped with instruments and devices in approximately 12 student stations for simulated in-life driving instruction

Small Conference Room: An area of assembly for 8-10 people

Small Group Instruction: Grouping of learners into numbers of 28 or less enabling interaction for maximum communication

Student Station: place from which student normally functions while in learning environment

Study Carrel: A student study station. Utilized desk, table, or booth designed to facilitate effective study. May include electronic and optical devices for dissemination information; controlled either by the student or outside programming services as teaching machine, audio transmission and reception facilities

Syncromist: Fine insecticide spray control

Tack Board: Board usually made of cork for display purposes

Teacher Station: An area with the necessary facilities for teacher's preparation of text, material, visuals, etc.

Television Monitor: Viewing station for television

Visual Acuity (Driver Education): machine for testing sight

VTR: Video Tape Recorder

Wet Carrel: Study Carrel equipped with electric components

Wire Mold: An electrical Device of a continuous nature in which the outlets are spaced on a 12-inch, 24-inch, etc., basis.

 

PHILOSOPHY

 

The secondary schools of Bay County have the responsibility of providing educational experiences for all the youth of the county.

These educational experiences should be of such depth and scope that each individual will be provided an opportunity to receive training commensurate with his learning capacities, abilities, and needs.

The home, church, community agencies, and institutions should assist in the reinforcement and integration processes in the school. A feeling of mutual respect and concern must prevail if optimum growth is to occur.

The educational experiences offered in schools should be based on the educational needs of youth. These need center around involvement in the realities of today's world and in the nature of their own social and psychological development in relation to these realities.

Competent analyses of these needs indicate they may be classified into categories for planning purposes:

  I. SELF IDENTIFICATION, VALUE ORIENTATION, AND GOAL DEVELOPMENT

Characteristics common to youth today are confusion, a feeling of insignificance, and alienation from the mainstream of society. To meet these needs the schools should provide systematic opportunities for youth to study their own situation, begin establishing goals, planning their school behavior, and implementing programs consistent with these goals. They also need opportunities to share their concerns with others whom they trust, as well as opportunities to examine their own beliefs and values privately.

  II. CULTURAL STUDY

 

In this period of rapid change youth have grown up with little understanding of the nature or basic elements of our culture. If they are to become fully functioning, responsible citizens they must know, and be able to relate to, the background of experiences passed on to them. It is the responsibility of the school to provide a common learning program with specially designed contents taken from the humanities, social studies, and other disciplines to help develop these concepts.

  III. SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

In the complex society that exists today all individuals need a high level competency in common skills of communications, computation, etc. Each individual needs an opportunity to further develop these skills.

  IV SPECIALIZATION AND IN-DEPTH STUDY

To function efficiently in our society today, an individual must be able to relate not only to other individuals, but also make a contribution of his own. The school program, therefore, must provide opportunities for youth to explore all areas in which they can contribute and be of such nature that each can prepare for his own specialty. This would include opportunities for in-depth study of academics for youth planning professional and technical careers and training enabling them to accept employment upon completion of high school.

 

OBJECTIVES

 

  I. Provide program of instruction with sufficient variety to enable all students to receive instruction commensurate with their academic and vocational needs.
  II. Provide needed facilities, supplies, and equipment.
  III. Provide guidance services adequate to assist students in developing goals and in the solution of their problems.
  IV Provide wholesome environment for students.

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

I. PHILOSOPHY

The school exists to prepare its students for the best type of citizenship in a democratic society. School administration should be consistent with the democratic philosophy of life as evolved in the growth of our nation and every effort should be made to insure equal educational opportunities for all students.

The administration of each school should constantly strive to obtain the co-operation of all forces for the improvement of instruction and should provide the most favorable atmosphere possible for maximum achievement of teachers and students.

The administration is charged with the responsibility of interpreting the entire school program to students, parents, and community. Reports to these groups should be frequent, fair, impartial, and above all, truthful representations of existing conditions.

In essence, school administration does not exist for itself. It must facilitate the education of all youth if it is to be worthy of recognition in a democratically functioning school system.

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

  A. Course Title and/or Room Use
      Does not apply
  B. Activities
      Does not apply.
  C. Grouping
     Does not apply

III. SPACE NEEDS

  A. Estimate of pace needs

    1. Total projected school enrollment
       2500 students, grades 9 through 12, with a faculty of 125 members
    2. Policy of Group Size
        Does not apply.
    3. Number of Sections of Each Size Group
       Does not apply
    4. Number of Periods in Schedule
       Does not apply
    5. Number of Teacher Stations Required
      Does not apply.
    6. Estimated Amount of Square Footage needed as a "Guide Only"
       To meet Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards,
       Level 2:

      a. Administrative Office
         (1) Reception Area 480 sq. ft.
         (2) Principal's office 300 sq. ft.
         (3) Individual Offices for four
              Assistant principals, each
             Office 200 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft.
         (4) Bookkeeper's Office 120 sq. ft.
         (5) Work Room and Storage 200 sq. ft.
         (6) Rest rooms 70 sq. ft.
         (7) Multipurpose Conference Room
              To be shared with Guidance
             (See description in Guidance
             Specifications) 120 sq.ft.
         (8) Data processing Room 120 sq.ft.
      b. Attendance Area 400 sq.ft.
      c. Conference Room 120 sq.ft.
      d. Health Rooms 325 sq. ft.
      e. Corridors 300 sq. ft.
      f. Professional Library and
          faculty Room 300 sq. ft.
      g. School Supply Store 100 sq. ft.
      h. Student Activity Room 150 sq. ft.
              TOTAL ESTIMATED FOOTAGE 3785 sq.ft.

  B. Furniture and Equipment
    1. Furniture
        a. Administrative Office
           (1)   Reception Area

                 (a). 2 sofas

                 (b). 6 chairs, lounge

 
                 (c). 2 tables, end


           (2) Secretarial Area
                (a) 2 desks, secretarial with typewriter lifts
                (b) 2 chairs, posture
                (c) 1 table, multipurpose
                (d) 4 chairs for multipurpose table
                (e) 3 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
           (3). Principal's Office
             (a) 1 desk, executive conference
             (b) 1 chair, executive
             (c) 1 sofa
             (d) 4 chairs, lounge
             (e) 2 tables, end
             (f) 2lamps
             (g) 2 cabinets, file, 30drawer, legal size, locks
             (h) 1 cabinet, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
         (4). Assistant Principals' Offices (4)
             (a) 4 desks, executive conference
             (b) 4 chairs, executive
             (c) 20 chairs, office
             (d) 4 tables, end
             (e) 4 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
             (f) 4 cabinets, file, 3-drawer, legal size, side
                  Storage, locks
         (5). Bookkeeper's office
            (a )1 desk, secretarial, with typewriter lift
            (b )1 chair, posture
            (c )4 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
            (d )1 cabinet, storage, adjustable shelves, metal, locks
         (6). Work Room and Storage
            (a). 1 table, multipurpose
            (b). 2 chairs for multipurpose table
         (7). Data Processing Room
            (a). 1 desk, secretarial
            (b). 1 chair, posture

    b. Attendance Area
        (1 )Waiting Area
             (a) 5 chairs
             (b) 1 desk, small, conference type
        (2) Secretarial Area
             (a) 1 desk, secretarial, with typewriter lift
             (b) 1 chair, posture
             (c) 1 table, multipurpose
             (d) 4 chairs for multipurpose table
             (e) 2 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
        (3) Conference Room
            (a). 1 table
            (b). 5 chairs
        (4) Health Room
            (a) Office
                1). 1 desk
                2.) 1 chair, desk type
                3.) 1 chair, straight back
                4). 1 cabinet, filing, 2-drawer, legal size, locks
           (b) girls' health room
                1). 4 cots
                2). 2 chairs, straight back
               3.) 1 table, small
           (c) boys' health room
               1) 3 cots
               2) 2 chairs, straight back
               3) 1 table, small

    c. other areas (not physical part of administrative area)

        (1) professional library and faculty room
            (a) 2 sofas
            (b) 9 chairs, lounge
            (c) 1 table, conference
            (d) 10 chairs, for conference table
            (e) 2 tables, end
            (f) 2 lamps
        (2) student activity room
            (a) 1 desk
            (b) 1 chair, desk type
            (c) 1 table, typewriter
            (d) 1 chair, posture
            (e) 1 table, multipurpose
            (f) 6 chairs, for multipurpose table
            (g) 1 cabinet, file, 4-drawer, legal size, locks
        (3) miscellaneous
            (a) Lockers, recessed, for student storage(2500 individual)

 

  2. Equipment
      a. Administrative Office
         (1) Reception Area
            (a) 125Mailboxes for faculty members
         (2) secretarial area
            (a) 2 typewriters, electric
            (b) 1 cabinet, file, for 5' x 8' cards, 4-drawer
            (c) 1 school communication conso9le
            (d) 1 clock, control
         (3) principal's office
            (a) 1 tape recorder
         (4) bookkeeper's office
            (a) 1 typewriter, electric
            (b) 1 adding machine, electric'
            (c) 1 check writer
            (d) 1 wall safe
         (5) work room and storage
            (a) 1 mimeograph machine, electric
            (b) 1 duplicator, electric
            (c) 1 copying machine
            (d) 1 paper cutter, 36" x 36"


      b. Attendance Area


         (1) Secretarial Area
             (a) 1 typewriter, electric
             (b) 1 calculator
             (c) 2 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, for 5" x 8" cards
             (d) 1 rack for attendance registers
       c. Health Room
         (1) health Room Office
            (a) 1 cabinet, first aid, metal, with locks
       d. other Areas (not physical part of Administrative Area)
         (1) School supply Store
              (a) 1 cash drawer
         (2) student activity room
             (a) 1 typewriter

IV. STORAGE

     A. Number, Types, and Sizes of Items to be Stored
          Does not apply
     B. Size of Cabinets or Shelving
        1. Administrative Office
            a. Waiting Area
                Work counter to separate this area from secretarial area, 12 ft. long with closed storage space under counter
            b. principal's office
                Bookshelf 3.5 ' x 4' with 3 adjustable shelves and sliding glass doors
           c. Work room and storage
               2 Formica top work counters with sink in one counter with hot and cold water, closed locked storage below and open shelves above. These should be on two sides of room.
        2. Attendance area
            a. Waiting area
                Work counter to separate this area from secretarial area with closed storage space under counter
        3. Other areas ( not physical part of administrative area)
            a. Professional library and faculty room

               Shelves, 18" deep, adjustable, for books and magazines
            b. School supply store
               (1) Work counter to separate students from supplies, with storage space under counter, with locks
               (2)  Shelves, display, with locks
            c. Student activity room
               Shelves, 18" deep, adjustable, for books
            d. Miscellaneous
               (1) Case, trophy, recessed with adjustable shelves, sliding glass doors with locks, interior light
               (2) Bulletin board, recessed, area with tracks for 12" shelving, celotex or comparable material for wall cover, sliding glass doors with locks, interior light

V. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

    A. Environmental


       1.Visual
          a. Colors should be attractive
          b. Lighting sufficient for reading throughout. Recessed ceiling fixtures for diffused light.
       2. Hearing
           All flat surfaces, floors, walls, and ceilings should be coustically treated.
       3. Climate control- heating, ventilating, temperature central air conditioning


    B. Utilities


       1. Administrative office

           a. Reception area

             120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

           b. Secretarial area

             (1) 120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

             (2)120v double convenience outlet in floor for electric typewriter
             (3)2 telephones with intercommunication

           c. Principal's office

             (1)120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.
             (2)1 telephone with intercommunication and exclusion button
             (3)restroom

           d. Assistant principals' offices(4)

             (1)4 telephones with intercommunication
             (2)120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

           e. Bookkeeper's office

              120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

           f. restrooms
            (1)1male

            (2)1 female

           g. data processing room

            wiring for data processing equipment

     2. Health Rooms

         a.Health room office
          (1)1 telephone
          (2) 2 120v double convenience outlets

         b. girls' health room
           (1)restroom with hot and cold water
           (2)120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

         c. boys' health room
           (1)restroom with hot and cold water
           (2)120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

    3. Other Areas( not physical part of administration area)

        a. Professional library and faculty room
          (1)telephone
          (2)120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.
          (3)2 restrooms (1 male, 1 female) 2 water closets each, 2 lavatories each with hot and cold water.

        b. Student activity room
           120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft.

        c. Miscellaneous
           (1) 4 telephones, pay, strategically located on campus
           (2) educational television capacity

  C. Service ­ School and Community

     1. Access drives
        Does not apply
     2.Pparking
        Does not apply
     3. doorways for delivery, access
       Does not apply

  D. Storage
    Does not apply.

  E. Floor Materials, Room Finishes (performance qualities only)

     1. All material used for acoustically treating floors should be fire proof.
     2. Bulletin board material (celotex, tackboard, etc.) in each room at eye level 4' x 8'
     3. Data processing room should have floating floor.

 

VI. RELATIONSHIPS (BUBBLE DIAGRAM)


  A. Within the Program


      1. Principal's office should have entrance from reception area in addition to one other.

      2. 4 assistant principals' offices should be entered from reception area. In addition, 2 should have direct entrance to attendance area.

      3. Bookkeeper's office should open directly from reception area and also from main hall.

      4. Attendance area should be connected with administrative office, but apart from it. Public entrance should be from a main hall.

      5. Conference room should be entered from attendance waiting area.

      6. Health office should be entered directly from attendance waiting area.

      7. School supply store should be entered from an outside hall, patio, or commons.

      8. Student activity room should be entered from a main hall near administration office.

      9. Waiting area in attendance rooms should be arranged to take care of heavy student traffic before school for admits cards.

 

  B. To Closely Related Programs

      1. Guidance ­ the administrative area should be separate from, but adjacent to, the guidance area with freedom of communication between and equal case of access to records.

      2. classrooms ­ the administrative area should be located for easy accessibility to teachers and students.

  C. To Entifre Campus

      Administrative offices should be near main entrance of school.

VII. BIBLIOGRAPHY


School visitations by committee, 1969.


ADMINISTRATION


Link to: Administration - Space Relationships


ART

 

I. PHILOSOPHY

A. Individual Program

    Creative experience and effective living are interdependent. Educational areas offering creative activities afford greatest possibility of     interrelation with in-life experience.

    Creativity resulting from the perceptual and conceptual experiences is an intimate aspect of personality development and vital to a curriculum motivate perception which lends itself to increased discrimination in other areas. There is a growing awareness of the positive value of creative     involvement for the satisfaction of personal needs and social well-being . Only recently have art experiences received recognition in our culture as a necessary element in human development.

    Art experiences should involve more that acquiring skills in manipulation of materials. Knowledge of the forces of the visual elements and ability to delineate one's personal ideas and images are essential to full experiences. The quality program should provide for individually developed curriculum. Dictated by individual interests and abilities. This curriculum should be continuous and sequential in nature.

    The art experiences should increase awareness of the process of human action and behavioral development. Value of art experiences lies in     what happens during the process of producing as well as in the end product. There is need to relate art to the culture and environment of the learner. Art is meaningful for the individual when it stems from and serves his personal-social developmental needs and purposes.

B. Course Purposes and Objectives

    1. Perceive acutely visual and tactile form.

    2. Respond aesthetically with increasing discrimination.

    3. Solve art problems creatively.

    4. Express visually and tactually personal concepts.

    5. Communicate effectively through visual production.

    6. Understand and respect personal visual expressions of others (past, present, peers, and children.)

C. Course Content

    There shall be provision for exploratory experiences, i. E., and introduction to the basic skills and concepts of both production and critics. The learner shall be exposed to a variety of materials, processes, artistic styles, cultural artifacts, and philosophies of art in a survey course for orientation. The next sequential step shall be in-depth study of the above with opportunity for expressing more personal preferences. The further study shall provide experiences more individualized and be structured by the student's choices for specializing (semester courses) in  processes or media he prefers. The content shall at all times be a fusion of the learner's own ideas reaching for proficiency in controlling and  manipulating materials and the visual elements. Opportunity for understanding various art heritages by cultures and identifying his personal aesthetic responses shall be prominent in the sequential learning activities.

 

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

  A. Course Title and/or Room Use

 

      1. ART I ­ General introduction to basic knowledge, skills, and vocabulary of art content. The basics are divided into three areas: Elements  (learning the forces of visual elements and how to control them for visual expression); Symbols (conceiving, identifying, and using personal images, ideas, and purposes0; Processes (acquiring skills in manipulating and controlling tools and materials). These basic areas shall be focused on individually at times for establishment and reinforcement of knowledge, but shall be fused for complete visual problem solving. Experiences shall consist of both production and criticism. (Full year course.)

      2. Art II ­ In-depth study of basic knowledge, skills, and vocabulary of art content? The basics shall be explored and refined through increased discrimination of production and criticism. The students participating shall have successfully processed through art I or demonstrated knowledge and skills commensurate with requirements of Art I. (Full year course.)

      3. ArtIII ­ In-depth study of specific areas of interest. Channeling of students into vocational-technical training shall be initiated at this point through cooperation with the vocational program. College-bound students shall be offered broader fine arts units to relate with other humanities courses. Opportunity for art careers shall be studied. These courses shall be available to students having successfully processed through Art I and Art II or demonstratingknowledge and skills commensurate with requirements of Art I and Art II.

          a. ART HISTORY (semester course)

          b. SCULPTURE(semester course)

          c. PAINTING(semester course)

          d. CERAMICS(semester course)

          e. METALCRAFT(semester course)

          f. COMMERCIAL ART( full year course)

 

  B. Activities

      1. Teacher

          a. Evaluate student competencies for grouping.

          b. Organize groups and designate appropriate activities for emphasis.

          c. Evaluate student growth (assess accomplishment of instructional objectives)

          d. Prepare lists of material, equipment, audio-visual, tools, and supplies for annual budget. (Inventory assumed.)

          e. Evaluate total art program in the school (attainment of broad purposes and objectives.)

          f. Relate art to other areas of curriculum (meaningful application of concepts.)

          g. Orient other curriculum area teachers to contributions of art to the total program.

          h. Involve community resources and lay citizens in designing art curriculum for specific and realistic student needs.

          i. Assist community organizations which sponsor art education and/or activities.

          j. Upgrade quality of art curriculum based on current research.

          k. guide students in art career choices.

          l. update knowledge of art research, processes, materials, contemporary professional art, production and writings.

          m. Actively support professional art organizations9local, state, and national.)

      2. Students

          a. Criticize art by;

            (1  )seeing objects
            (2)  touching objects
            (3)  talking about objects
            (4)  asking questions about objects
            (5)  Responding to objects other than verbally or in writing
            (6)  selecting objects

        b. produce art by:

            (1)  forming and constructing
            (2)  printing
            (3)  drawing
            (4)  Painting
            (5)  Displaying

  C. Grouping

      1. Size of class

          Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards, Level 2, specify that no more than 25 pupils shall be assigned to the room at any one time.

      2. Arrangement or grouping of students

          a.modular scheduling shall involve large and small group sessions.
          b.individual study shall be necessary especially in Art III.
          c.A-V scheduling shall sometimes involve as many as 150 students.
          d.night classes shall be accommodated in cooperation with vocational education, made possible by modular scheduling and differentiated staffing.

III. SPACE NEEDS

  A. Estimate of Space Needs

      1. Projected Enrollment of Subjects

          a. Art I 250students
          b. ArtII 200 students
          c. ArtIII
             (1)commercial Art 50 students
             (2)Art History 25 students
             (3)Sculpture 25 students
             (4)Painting 25 students
             (5)Ceramics 25 students
             (6)metal craft 25 students
               TOTAL 625 students
      2. Policy of Group Sizes

          Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards, Level 2, state that no more than 25 pupils shall be assigned to the room at any one time. Modular scheduling shall be used whenever practical and cause group sizes to vary with the planned activity.

      3. Number of sections of each size group

          a. ArtI 10 sections
          b. Art II 8 sections
          c. Art III
            (1)commercial art 2 sections
            (2)art history 1 section
            (3)sculpture 1 section
            (4)painting 1 section
            (5)ceramics 1 section
            (6)Metalcraft 1 section
                   TOTAL 25 scetions

       4. Number of periods in schedule

           a. Modular scheduling 3 days production 1.5 hours per day pe4 week; 2 days critique and lecture 0.5 hour per day.

           b. Rigid scheduling 55-minute periods, 6 periods per day comprehensive.

       5. Number of teacher stations required

           5 teaching stations

       6. Estimated amount of square footage needed as "guide only"

           Florida state proposed accreditation standards, level 2, state: "65 square feet working space per pupil"

          Therefore:
          125 pupil capacity
           65 sq. ft. working space per pupil
          8,125 sq. ft. for 125 pupils
          2,000 sq. ft. storage
          10,215 sq. ft. working and storage space 125 pupils

          450 sq. ft. teacher work-conference area

  B. FURNITURE AND WQUIPMENT

     1. Furniture

          a. General art laboratory

               (1) 3 cabinets, drawing board storage. 83" high x 28" deep x48" wide, 1 vertical partition, 2 fixed and 2 adjustable shelves, on 5" casters.

               (2) 3 cabinets, display-storage, 83" high x 24" deep x 60" wide, 2 sloping retractable magazine shelves with storage behind, 2 adjustable shelves with corkboard door, pull-out chart rack                     with 12 rails and 3 legal file drawers, on 5": casters.

                (3) 30 tables, student multipurpose type, leveling glides, full length reinforcing stretchers, glides for 4 tote trays, 30" high x 42: deep x 60" wide, plastic laminated surface.

                (4) 90 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swivel sat, metal support and legs.

                (5) 3 chalk-cork assembly, portable, 48" x 72" chalkboard on one side, matching size cork on other. Mounted on 3" casters (heavy duty swivel with brakes on 2).

                (6) 30 tables, adjustable drawing. Top adjusts to any angle, locking automatically up to 30
   
                (7) 6 cabinets, tote tray storage, 83" high x 24" deep x 60" wide. Holds 72 trays measuring 4.5 high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide. On 5" casters with brakes on 2.
                (8) 3 lecterns

         b. Ceramics laboratory

                  (1) 15 tables, student multipurpose type. Leveling glides full length reinforcing stretchers, glides for 4 tote trays, 30" x high x 41"deep x 60" wide, plastic laminated surface

                  (2) 30 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swi9vel seat, metal support and legs

                   (3) 3 chairs, lounge type. Upholstery easily cleaned.
     
                   (4) 1 lectern

          c. Metals ­ sculpture laboratory

                   (1) 2 cahinets, metalworking storage. 62" wide x 22" deep x 84"high. Lower area with separate doors, 3 shelves for tote trays, separate lock. Top section with hooks and hangers for                          tools.

                   (2) 10 tables, dual student station. 10 shelves center below work surface for tote trays which measure 4.5" high x 19.5" long x 12.% wide. 1 double 120v convenience outlet for each                          student in front of work space. Work surface laminated plastic.

                    (3) 2 cabinets, tote tray storage, 83.5" high x 24.5" deep x 60.5" wide, holds 72 trays measuring 4.5" high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide on 5" casters with brakes on 2

                    (4) 5 work benches, work surface 56" long x 50" deep x 30" wide, with 6 storage lockers underneath. Storage area measures 48" deep x 36" long x 30" high. Reinforced edge grain                          maple top.

                    (5) 40 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swivel seat, metal support and legs

                    (6) 3 chairs, lounge type, upholstery easily cleaned

                     (7) 1 lectern

             d. Teacher work area

                    (1) 5 chairs, teacher desk type
                    (2) 5 desks, teacher, 60" long x 29.5" deep x 28" high. Maple top with semi-circular dropleaf.

   

      2. Equipment

            a. General Art Laboratory

           Therefore:

           125 pupil capacity
           65 sq. ft. working space per pupil
           8,125 sq. ft. for 125 pupils
           2,000 sq. ft. storage
           10,215 sq. ft. working and storage space 125 pupils

             450 sq. ft. teacher work-conference area

  B. Furniture and Equipment

      1. Furniture

         a. General Art Laboratory

               (1) 3 cabinets, drawing board storage. 83" high x 28" deep x 48" wide, 1 vertical partitions, 2 fixed and 2 adjustable shelves, on 5" casters.

               (2) 3 cabinets, display-storage, 83" high x 24" deep x 60" wide, 2 sloping retractable magazine shelves with storage behind, 2 adjustable shelves with corkboard door, pull-out chart rack with 12 rails and 3 legal file drawers, on 5" casters

               (3) 30 tables, student multipurpose type, leveling glides, full length reinforcing stretchers, glides for 4 tote trays, 30" high x 42" deep x 60" wide, plastic laminated surface.

                (4) 90 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swivel seat, metal support and legs.

                (5) 3 chalk-cork assembly, portable, 48" x 72" chalkboard on one side, matching size cork on other. Mounted on 3" casters (heavy-duty swivel with brakes on 2).

                (6) 30 tables, adjustable drawing. Top adjusts to any angle, locking automatically up to 30, slides for to tea tray. 30" high x 24" deep x 36" long. Plastic laminated surface.

                 (7) 6 cabinets, tote tray storage. 83" high x 24" deep x 60" wide. Holds 72 trays measuring 4.5 "high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide. On 5" casters with brakes on 2.

                 (8) 3 lecterns

         b. Ceramics laboratory

                 (1) 15 tables, student multipurpose type. Leveling glides full length reinforcing stretchers, glides for 4 tote trays, 30" high x 41" deep x 60" wide, plastic laminated surface

                 (2) 30 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swivel seat, metal support and legs

                 (3) 3 chairs, lounge type. Upholstery easily cleaned.

                 (4) 1 lectern

          c. Metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory

                 (1) 2 cabinets, metalworking storage. 62" wide x 22" deep x 84" high. Lower area with separate doors, 3 shelves for tote trays,  separate lock. Top section with looks and hangers for tools

                 (2) 10 tables, dual student station. 10 shelves center below work surface for tote trays which measure 4.5 high x 19.5 long x 12.5  wide. 1 double 120v convenience outlet for each student in front of work space. Work surface laminated plastic.

                 (3) 2 cabinets, tote tray storage, 83.5 "high x 24.5" deep . 60.5 "wide, holds 72 trays measuring 4.5" high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide on  5" casters with brakes on 2

                 (4) 5 work benches, work surface 56" long x 50" deep x 30" wide, with 6 storage lockers underneath. Storage area measures 48"  deep x 36" long x 30"high. Reinforced edge grain maple top.

                  (5) 40 stools, adjustable height, hardwood swivel seat, metal support and legs

                  (6) 3 chairs, lounge type, upholstery easily cleaned

                  (7) 1 lectern

          d. Teacher work area

                  (1) 5 chairs, teacher desk type

                  (2) 5 desks, teacher, 60" long x 29.5" deep x 28" high. Maple top with semi-circular dropleaf.

    2. Equipment

          a. General Art Laboratory

                  (1) 450 tote trays 4.5 high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide
                  (2) 60 easels, table type, flat folding
                  (3) 1 matt cutter
                  (4) 1 trimming board with stand 37" x 31"
                  (5) 3 paper cutters 24" x24"
                  (6) 1 paper cutter (for large rolls 36" wide)
                  (7) 3 pencil sharpeners, multi-sized.
                  (8) 5 drying racks for graphics
                  (9) 6 hot plates, double, 3 phase, 120v
                  (10) 3 irons, electric, steam and dry, 120v
                  (11) 1 sewing machine, electric: in cabinet
                  (12) 1 printing press 12" x 24" bed, 10" x 14' chase, manual operation

            b. Ceramics Laboratory
                  (1) 1 kiln, with pyrometer and automatic cutoff, 3 phase, 2350F, cone 10 maximum, 20" x20" x20", side loading, with furniture

                  (2) 1 kiln, with pyrometer and automatic cutoff, 3 phase, 2000F, cone 03 maximum, 18" x18" x18", side loading, with furniture

                  (3) 6 potter's wheels, 2 speed, portable electric, complete with sit down stand.

                  (4) 1 spray booth, enclosed fan exhaust, 120v, single phase, 24" wide x 28" deep x28" high, mounted on 32" stand, with motor  exhaust, turntable, control switch, air filter and                        regulator

                  (5) 1 sprayer, with diaphragm, ball bearing compressor, gun and hose

                  (6) 2 kiln carts, heatproof, 24" x36", 3 tray, 14" free-wheeling wheels

                  (7) 1 scale, precision calibrated spring, extra heavy, capacity 60 pounds

                  (8) 6 wedging boards, 21 7/8" wide x 14" deep x 14" high

                  (9) 1 pug mill, 40" long x 8 7/8" wide x 9.5" high, 1/3H.P., 115 volts

                 (10) 30 banding wheels, 12" head, heavy cast iron
                 (11) 1 pottery scale, with weights, triple beam balance
                 (12) 2 infrared lamps
                 (13) 36 tote trays 4.5" high x 19.5" long x 7.5" wide
                 (14) 1 pencil sharpener, multi-sized

 

           c. Metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory

                 (1) 1 kiln 23" wide x 16" high x 19" deep exterior; 12" x 12" x 6 " high interior, with pyrometer, 3 phase, 220v

                 (2) 1 kiln 22" x 13" x 25" exterior; 12" x 10 3/4" x 4 3/4' interior, infrared lamp, 220v

                 (3) 2 grinders, 1 phase, 60 cycle, 115v, 1/3 H.P., 6" x 3/4" x 1/2" with guard covers

                 (4) 6 polishing motors, 2 speed, 1/4 H.P., 1725 and 3400 rpm, 2 spindle, with switch and hoods

                 (5) 10 machinist vises, swivel base, jaw width 4", opening 6"

                 (6) 1 hand metal punch, floor model, with standard equipment

                 (7) 1 cutter-bender, heavy duty construction, on mobile platform, cam-tatic leverage

                 (8) 1 scroll saw, 24", 3 phase, 1/3 H.P., push button starter, 230v

                 (9) 1 drill press, floor type, 1/2 H.P., 3 phase, push button switch and magnetic starter, 1725 rpm, 230v

                 (10) 3 bayonet saws, 115v, 25-60 cycle, 3500 rpm, 3 conductor cord

                 (11) 2 welding screens, triple, portable, 6' x 6' x 6', with casters, permanent fire resistance

                  (12) 1 stake stand, 31.5 long x 9" deep top, 18" deep bottom, stakeplate 30" x 8", heavy duty construction

                  (13) 2 welding and cutting outfits, complete with two 2 stage oxygen-acetylene regulators, torch, tips, cutting attachment, goggles, sparklighter, and wrench

                  (14) 4 sculpture stands, wooden platform 5' wide x 5' deep x 18" high, surface fireproof, on 5" lock casters

                  (15) 6 anvils, heavy duty

                  (16) 6 anvil stands

                 (17) 1 bending jig

          d. Teacher work-conference area

                 (1) 5 cabinets, file, 4-drawer, legal size
                 (2) 1 typewriter
                 (3) 1 duplicating machine
                 (4) 5 overhead projectors
                 (5) 2 opaque projectors
                 (6) 5 viewing screens, portable
                 (7) 2 viewing screen, wall mounted
                 (8) 5 slide projectors
                 (9) 5 filmstrip projectors
                (10) 2 8mm loop projectors
                (11) 1 16mm projector
                (12) 5 overhead projection carts
                (13) 5 A-V carts
                (14) 1 camera, still
                (15) 5 carts, supply type, 3 shelves, surface easily cleaned, 24" wide x 36" high, x 36" long, 5" casters, hand rail

IV. STORAGE

     A. Number, types, and sizes of items to be stored.

         1. Flat storage for papers ranging in size 12" wide to 48" wide

         2. Upright storage for bottles, cans, bags, boxes of dry and liquid items up to 36" high

         3. Bulk storage for tools, instruments, equipment, supplies

         4. Hanging storage for tools, instruments, equipment, supplies

         5. Two and three-dimensional storage for student work ­ in - progress

         6. Flat storage for metals and woods, maximum 100" lo9ng, 36" wide

         7. Damp storage (clays, ceramic work-in-progress)

         8. Dry storage 9 ceramic work-in-progress)

     B. Size of Cabinets or Shelving

         1. General Art Laboratory

            a. Open shelving

              (1) 36" 480 linear feet. Height, floor to ceiling acceptable. Adjustable shelves, all surfaces finished with epoxy or equal. Celotex on back walls.

            b. Closed shelving

              (1) 36" 320 linear feet, height not above level of reach of student. Adjustable shelves. Surfaces finished with epoxy or equal. Sliding doors with formica or equal covering.

              (2) 18" 36 linear feet. Book shelving with lockable galss sliding doors, interior light, adjustable shelves.

              (3) 24" 16 linear feet, display case with lockable sliding glass doors, interior light, adjustable shelves.

        2. Ceramics Laboratory

            a. Open shelving

              (1) 24" deep, 200 linear feet. Height, floor to ceiling acceptable. Adjustable shelves. All surfaces finished with epoxy or equal.

              (2) 36" deep, 160 linear feet, height from 56" above fllor to ceiling, open both front and back for air passage. Can be in 4 sections onwheels.

            b. Closed shelving

              (1) 24" deep, 320 linear feet. Height, floor to ceiling acceptable. Some counter-top available between lower and upper cabinets covered  with formaca or equal. Adjustable shelves. All other surfaces finished with epoxy or equal. Sliding doors with master lock.

              (2) 24" , 160 linear feet. Height, not above 36" from floor. Inner walls treated for moisture retention. Pull-out type shelving which has adjustable height.

               (3) 18", 37 linear feet. Book shelving, adjustable, lockable glass sliding doors.

               (4) 24", 16 linear feet. Display case with lockable sliding glass doors, interior light, adjustable shelves.

                (5) Storage under wedging board area for 130 tote trays which measure 4.5" high x 19.5" long x 12.5"wide.

        3. Metals ­ Sculpture laboratory

            a. open shelving

               36", 320 linear feet. Height, floor to ceiling aceptable. Adjsutable shelves. All surfaces finished with epoxy or equal.

            b. Closed shelving

                (1) 36', 320 linear feet. Height, floor to 36". Counter-type top covered with formica or equal. Adjustable shelves. Aliding doors with  master lock. All other surfaces finished with epoxy or equal.

                (2) 18", 36 linear feet. Book shelving with lockable sliking glass doors. Adjsutable shelves.

                (3) 24", 16 linear feet. Display casee with lockable sliding glass doors, ionterior light. Adjustable shselves.

         4. Teacher work-conference area

             Closed shelving

            48", 40 linear feet, sliding doors which lock individually (not on master), adjustable shelves. Surfaces finished with epoxy or equal.

    C. Size of Storage Area

          1. General Art laboratory

              Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards, Level 2, state 400 sq. ft. storage space per room capacity of 25 pupils. This laboratory will accommodate 3 classrooms and require 1200sq.ft. storage.

          2. Ceramics laboratory

               Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards, Level 2, state 400 sq. ft. storage space per room capacity of 25 pupils. This laboratory will accommodate 1 classrooms and require 400sq.ft. storage.

          3. metals ­ Sculpture laboratory

              Florida State Proposed Accreditation Standards, Level 2, state 400 sq. ft. storage space per room capacity of 25 pupils. This laboratory will accommodate 1 classrooms and require 400sq.ft. storage.

          4. Teacher work-conference area

              Small closet, wardrobe type, for coats, hats, personal effects, 6" x4"

V. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  A. Environmental

      1. Visual

          a. Overhead lighting continuous throughout all areas

          b. Individual lighting (spotlights) throughout each of the laboratories, located for effectual display

          c. Rheostat for variation in intensity oflightor angle of focus

          d. Display areas of finished work especially need lighting which can be varied in color, angle, andintensity

          e. Master switch for each of the laboratories for facilitating control

          f. Panic switch panel in metals ­ sculpture area

    2. Hearing

          a. Acoustically treated floors, walls, and ceilings in all areas

          b. Metals ­ sculpture area self-contained to prevent noise penetration other areas

          c. Patio area equipped with same inner-school public address system as clasrooms

          d. Teacher stations acoustically treated for individualized listening stations (A-V equipment)

          e. Intercommunication station in each of the 5 teacher stations. Station in metals ­ sculpture area should have volume control to compenstae for class activity noise.

    3. Climate Control ­ heating, Ventilating, Temperature

          a. Climatically controlled

          b. Individual contro for each room

          c. Exhause facilities in ceramics laboratory spray booth

          d. Exhaust facilities in General Art Laboratory, Ceramic Laboratory, and Metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory areas for gases, acid fumes, dust particles, and paint odors

          e. No air conditioning in kiln area or ceramic drying room

          f. gentle blower system in General Art laboratory for drying work-in-progress

  B. Utilities

     1. General Art Laboratory

         a. Plumbing
            (1) floor drain in each teacher station area.
            (2) All plumbing should be acid resistant.
            (3) Three spigots available for attaching water hose.
            (4) 3 peninsula sink assemblies, 36" high x 56' deep x 55" wide. Sinks 18 gauge stainless steel, acid resistant, complete with faucets  (gooseneck type), strainers, and interceptor trap. Complete with drinking spigot.

         b. Electricity

            (1) 4 110v double convenience outlets in audio-visual areas

            (2) 110v double convenience outlets every 6 ft. along uncovered wall base board

            (3) 2 110v double convenience outlets at counter height level in bulk storhe areas

            (4) Strong overhead lighting in entire laboratory areas

            (5) 5 110v double floor outlets
            (6) Strong overhead lighting in bulk storage room
            (7) Spotlights with rheostat in display areas
            (8) light control switch in each audio-viewing area
            (9) Educaional television capacity
            (10) 3 intercommunicaion stations ( one for each teacher)

        c. Fire extinguishers in several locations

   2. Ceramics Laboratory
        a. Plumbing
         (1) 1 peninula sink assembly 36" high x 56' deep x55" wide. Sinks 18 gauge stainless steel, acid resistant, complete with faucets  (gooseneck type), strainers, and interceptor traps. Complete with drinking spigot.

         (2) Floor drain.
         (3) All plumbing should be acid resistant
         (4) one spigot available for attaching water hose

       b. Electricity

         (1) 3 220v outlets for kilns

         (2) 2 110v double convenience outlets for spray booth area

         (3) 6 110v double convenience floor outlets in potter's wheel area

         (4) 110v double convenience outlets 12' apart in infrared lamp area

         (5) 110v double convenience outlets every 6' in display area

         (6) 110v double convenience outlets every 6 ft. along uncovered wall baseboard

         (7) 110v double convenience outlets every 6 ft. in drying area

         (8) Climatically controlled with individual switch in laboratory

         (9) Control panel for kilns

         (10) no air conditioning in drying room

         (11) 1 intercommunication station
       
         (12) Educational television capacity

      c. fire extinguishers in several locations

    3. Metals-sculpture laboratory

        a. Plumbing

            (1) 1 peninsula sink assembly 36" high x 56' deep x 55' wide. Sinks 18 gauge stainless steel, acid resistatn, complete with faucets  (gooseneck type), strainers, and interceptor traps. Complete with drink9ing spigot.

            (2) Floor drain in 2 locations
            (3) All plumbing should be acid resistant
            (4) one spigot available for attaching water hose

       b. Electricity

           (1) 110v double convenience outlet at counter heighg for each student work station

           (2) 10 110v double convenience floor outlets at work bench areas for floor mounted equipment

           (3) 2 110v double convenience outlets at couunter height in bulk storage room

          (4) 120v double convenience outlets every 6 ft. along uncovered wall base board

          (5) Exhaust switch over large sculpture area and over other areas where gas is used

          (6) 2 220v outlets for kilns

          (7) light in Glass display case

          (8) Strong overhead light in bulk storage room

          (9) 1 intercommunication station with volume control to compensate for class activity noises

          (10) Educaional television capacity

       c. Gas

           (1) oxygen-acetylene outlet at each student station, excluding the 7 workbench areas

           (2) 2 oxygen-acetylene outlets in large sculpture area for cutting, burning, heavy duty construction

        d. Fire extinguishers in several locations

  4. Teacher Work-Conference Area

      Electricity
      a. 1 110v double convenience outle at each teacher work station at counter height

       b. 4 110v double convenience outlets, one for each conference-listening carrel

       c. 1 telephone

       d. 1 intercommunication station

       e. Educational television capacity

  C. Service-School and Comunity

     1. Access Drives

         Must have access to outside patios, sculpture areas, bulk storage rooms, and delivery routes.

     2. Parking
 
          For large vehicles during float decoration, parade preparation,etc.

     3. Doorways for Delivery, Access

         a. must have large double outside doorways for equipment and supply access.

         b. Glass sliding doors to patio area from the General Art laboratory and Ceramics Laboratory

  D. Storage

    1. General Art laboratory

        a. Glassed-in display cases, lighted, for protection from dust

        b. locks on master key

   2. Ceramics Laboratory

       a. Glassed-in display, cases, lighted, for protection from dust.

       b. locks on master key

   3. Metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory

      a. Glassed-in display, cases, lighted, for protection from dust.

      b. locks on master key

   4. Teacher Work-conference Area

      locks on master key, except storage used for personal effects

  E. Floor Materials, Room Finishes ( Performance Qualities Only)

     1. maximum display surface (celotex, tackboard, etc.) as can be placed on unused wall surfaces within eye level.

     2. All surfaces should be easily cleaned.

     3. All surfaces in metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory should be flame resistant.

     4. Variety of textures should be used.

     5. Colors of finishes should be subdued to allow for predominance of art work.

     6. Studio area floors need floor drains for hosing down.

     7. Skylight should be used wherever possible.

     8. outside view in each area, through glass, plexiglass, or equivalent

     9. plexiglass innerwall in Metals ­ Sculpture Laboratory to give visibility between this and other areas and maintain sound proofling.

VI. RELATIONSHIPS (BUBBLE DIAGRAM)
    A. Within the Program

        1. mobility between all areas except Metals ­ Sculpture area which should be self-contained and soundproofed.

        2. Teacher work-conference area should have view of all areas, including metals-sculpture laboratory.

    B. To Closely Related Programs

       1. highly desirable to be adjacent to Industrial Arts.

       2. Advantageous to be adjacent to auditorium for stage pro production, scenery production, etc.

       3. Should have two outside entrance to Bulk Storage Room or vicinity.

    C. To Entire Campus

       1. Should be on area of campus allowing easy access to outside for sculpture, sketching, etc.

       2. Should have covered walkways to other areas of campus if in a separate building.

 


Link to : ART --Space Relationships


 

VII. BIBLIOGRAPHY

      A. " American Seating Company Catalogue". American Seating Company. Atlanta, Georgia, 1968

      B. "Arts and Crafts Catalogue". Arts and Crafts Materials Corporation. Baltimore, Maryland, 1968.

      C. "Brodhead-Garrett Catalogue". Brodhead-Garrett. Cleveland, Ohio, 1968.

      D. Conant, Howard and Randall, Arne. Art in Education. Peoria, Illinois: Charles A. Bnnett, 1963.

      E. Educational Specifications, Elementary Schools, Alachua County Board of Public Instruction, Gainesville, Florida, 1967.

      F. Educational Specifications, Elementary Schools. Atlanta public schools, Atlanta Board of Education, Atlanta, Georgia, 1963.

      G. Educational Specifications, Grades 7-12. Alachua County Board of Public Instruction, Gainesville, Florida, 1966

      H. Educational Specifications, High School. Broward County Board of Public Instruction,Fort lauderdale, Florida, 1965

      I. Educational Specifications, High Schol. Charlotte County Board of Public Instruction, punta gorda, Florida, 1965

      J. Educational Specificationa, High School. Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, Florida, 1965

      K. Educational Specifications, Junior High Charlotte County Board of Public Instruction, punta gorda, Florida, 1965

      L. Ellsworth, Ralph E. The School library. New York Educational Facilities Laboratory, 1963

      M. florida State Department of Education, Tallahassee:

          1. 1968-69 Accreditation Standards for all Florida Schools(proposed) 1968.

          2. Art for Florida Secondary Schools. Bulletin No. 18, 1965

          3. Educational Facilities Planning. October, 1965.

     N. lanier, Vincent. Teaching Secondary Art. Scranton, Pennsylania: International Textbook Company, 1964.

     O. National Art Education Association: " Why Art Education?" April, 1967. "Planning Facilities for Art Instruction". 1962.